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Dr Victoria Rogers

Academic Sessional

Contact Information Mobile: 0407 421742, Email: v.rogers@ecu.edu.au, Campus: Mount Lawley, Room: ML3.277
Staff Member Details
Mobile: 0407 421742
Email: v.rogers@ecu.edu.au
Campus: Mount Lawley  
Room: ML3.277  

 

Victoria is an Honorary Associate Professor at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts.

Current Teaching

MUS4119 - Supervision of honours students

Background

Victoria Rogers is a graduate of the University of Western Australia, having being awarded a BA, Dip. Ed., M.Phil. and PhD. As an undergraduate, Victoria was the recipient of the University Choral Society prizes for Music 20 and Music 30; she was also awarded a Hackett scholarship, which she declined in favour of a fifteen-year career as a professional cellist. This career led her to full-time appointments in the WA Symphony Orchestra and the State Orchestra of Victoria (the latter as co-principal cellist), and to casual appointments with the Sydney, Queensland and Tasmanian Symphony Orchestras. In 1996 she won an Australian Postgraduate Award (APA) for doctoral study, which she completed in 2000. Victoria joined the academic staff of UWA's School of Music upon completion of her PhD, first as Manager then as Director of the Callaway Centre, a research centre based in the School of Music. She established a state-of-the-art archival facility and procured over half a million dollars of Australian Research Council (ARC) funding for the development of the Callaway Centre’s archival collections. In 2006 she was appointed to the position of Lecturer in Musicology in the School of Music and was subsequently promoted to Associate Professor. In these capacities taught music language (tonal and post-tonal harmony, form and structure), research methods for honours students, and Western music history; she also supervised honours and doctoral students. After leaving UWA in 2015, Victoria took up an honorary appointment at the WA Academy of the Performing Arts.

Professional Associations

  • 1996 to the present: Member, Musicological Society of Australia (MSA)
  • 1998 and 2011: Member, organising committee for the annual conference of the MSA
  • 2003–2007: Member, National Committee, MSA
  • 2004–2006: National President, MSA
  • 2007–2015: Variously chair and member of UWA research and teaching committees
  • 2009–2015: Member of the National Film and Sound Archive Sounds of Australiaadvisory panel
  • 2016: Member, editorial board for MSA Proceedings on Music Performance and Analysis

Research Areas and Interests

Victoria's main area of research is early- to mid-twentieth century music, with a particular focus upon Australian composition and performance in the post-colonial period. Her doctoral dissertation examined the music of the Australian composer Peggy Glanville-Hicks; this research formed the basis of her monograph entitled The Music of Peggy Glanville-Hicks (Ashgate, 2009). Victoria has also written journal articles on the music of Glanville-Hicks and has co-edited a book on the work of the British social anthropologist and ethnomusicologist John Blacking, entitled The Legacy of John Blacking: Essays on Music, Culture and Society (to which she also contributed two co-authored chapters) (UWA Press, 2005). Her more recent research on Blacking, sponsored by an Australian Research Council (ARC) grant, resulted in two articles published in the prestigious international journal Ethnomusicology. The Australian pianist Eileen Joyce, who enjoyed a glittering international career in the mid-twentieth century, is the subject of a recently completed book which Victoria co–authored with Emeritus Professor David Tunley (UWA) and Cyrus Meher Homji (General Manager of Universal Music Australia).

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia, 2001.
  • Master of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia, 1991.
  • Diploma in Education, The University of Western Australia, 1970.
  • Bachelor of Arts, The University of Western Australia, 1969.
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